Twenty Years After Dayton: Where is Bosnia and Herzegovina Today?

In 2015, Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) marked the 20-year anniversary of the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement. Today, the legacy of this agreement still affects the citizens, politics, economy and society. A Weidenfeld – Hoffmann Alumna, Lana Pasic, examines the effects of the agreement on contemporary Bosnia in her e-book Twenty Years After Dayton: Where is Bosnia and Herzegovina Today?

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About the Scholar

Lana Pasic

Bosnia and Herzegovina
Development Studies (MPhil), 2013
St Cross College, Oxford
Hoffmann Scholar
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Maximising Social Welfare in India

Weidenfeld-Hoffmann alumnus Shohini Sengupta writes to us from New Delhi, where she is a Research Fellow at the Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy. Her research covers law and financial regulation, providing assessment and advice for the Indian government. In this blog post, she discusses her work and her recently published article on corporate responsibility

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About the Scholar

Shohini Sengupta

India
Law and Finance (MSc), 2015
Somerville College, Oxford
Louis Dreyfus Scholar
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“Am I Going to Eat Peace?” – The Politics of Redistribution and Recognition in Women’s Peace Activism

Louis Dreyfus Scholar Simukai Chigudu recently returned to Oxford after conducting field research in Northern Uganda among women’s peace activists. His article based on this research, ‘The Social Imaginaries of Women’s Peace Activism in Northern Uganda,’ has been published in the International Feminist Journal of Politics. In this blog post, he discusses the work he did and the ideas with which he has engaged.

The metanarrative of global feminism is often constructed as a progressive and emancipatory movement emanating from the West and fostering radical politics elsewhere in the world. Such a view is not only ethnocentric but, critically, it fails to engage with the complex ways in which feminist politics travel and are evinced in specific localities. In this blog post, based on a recently published research article entitled ‘The Social Imaginaries of Women’s Peace Activism in Northern Uganda’, I seek to understand how marginalised women in the ‘Global South’ – particularly in Africa – interpret, experience and negotiate feminist ideas to wield political power within the context of their social and moral worlds.

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About the Scholar

Simukai Chigudu

Zimbabwe
International Development (DPhil), 2017
St Anne's College, Oxford
Louis Dreyfus-Weidenfeld and Hoffmann Scholar
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What is Digital Diplomacy?

Hoffmann Scholar Ilan Manor, an expert in digital diplomacy and editor of the blog Exploring Digital Diplomacy, gives us a brief introduction into what digital diplomacy is and how it influences the world around us.

Technology has always impacted the practice of diplomacy. The printing press, for instance, contributed to the formation of nation states and the establishment of the role of Ambassadors. Mass media technologies such as the radio and television enabled governments to converse directly with the populations of neighboring states. The internet impacted the speed of diplomacy as diplomatic couriers and encrypted communications were replaced with more immediate means of communication such as the email.

Recent years have witnessed yet again the impact of technology on diplomacy with the migration of foreign ministries to social media (i.e., twitter, Facebook, YouTube). Often referred to as digital diplomacy, the incorporation of social media in the conduct of diplomacy may be viewed as both an evolution and a revolution in diplomatic practice.

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About the Scholar

Ilan Manor

Israel
International Development (DPhil), 2018
St Cross College, Oxford
Hoffmann Scholar
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Christmas in Combe

Louis-Dreyfus Scholar Nidhi Singh reflects on spending the festive period in Oxford, including a traditional British Christmas experience in Combe.

Coming from a country like India, where Christmas is not such a big celebration, experiencing this Christmas in a western country like the UK was quite special to me. The period around Christmas and New Year can get really lonely especially for international students who usually do not have their family around. Just before the Christmas break was going to start, I had so many people asking me my plans during Christmas, as it would get really lonely here. But I failed to understand the reason behind them asking me this question, until I really witnessed the period for myself. My experience of staying back for the festive period in the UK, however, was quite different.

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About the Scholar

Nidhi Singh

India
Law and Finance (MSc), 2016
Lincoln College, Oxford
Louis Dreyfus Scholar
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